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  1. #1
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    Britain SlutWalk

    Credit: The F Word

    Slutwalk London
    by Laura Woodhouse

    Slutwalk London is an anti-rape march taking place on Saturday 4 June in London. According to the organisers, the first Slutwalk took place as a response to a Toronto policeman telling a group of law students that in order to avoid being raped "women should avoid dressing like sluts". The event aims to challenge the default social position of "Don't get raped" and replace it with "Don't rape", taking the focus off the victims by showing that what they wear/dress/say/do prior to being raped is irrelevant: rapists choose to rape, and changing our behaviour as women won't stop that. In this spirit, the organisers encourage people of "all genders, races, ages, religions and sexualities" to join the march and "raise your voices, hemlines and heels against a violent culture that blames the victims of rape".

    I fully support the sentiment behind and the aims of the event, and think this approach actually makes more sense than a "reclaim the night" march in some ways, given that the focus on "night" - for me at least - inadvertently reaffirms the idea that the streets at night are dangerous for women, when those of us who attend RTNs all know that women are statistically most at risk of violence in our own homes with men we know, and young men are actually more at risk of violence on the streets.

    However, unless I was in Toronto where the march was a direct response to a comment about "sluts", I personally wouldn't feel comfortable walking under the label. I have no interest whatsoever in reclaiming or reinventing a word that is used to attack and label women, let alone use it in reference to myself. I don't tend to wear the kind of clothes deemed "sluttish" and I feel massively uncomfortable with the whole "f*ck you I can wear heels if I want to" attitude because I view heels as painful and restrictive and there's so much pressure on women to dress hyper-feminine anyway that it seems pretty self-defeating to me. I totally see the logic in this context - "f*ck you I can wear heels and it's STILL his fault if he rapes me" - but it's just not a space I can get involved in without pretending to be someone I'm not. I'm afraid the idea of showing the world that "slut is something to be proud of" just makes me cringe. I'd rather be myself and reject all the bullshit labels society might throw at me.

    So, I won't be there (I know, disaster!), but if this sounds like the march for you - and I know some feminists do see value in reclaiming "slut" - then head down to Trafalgar Square for 1pm on Saturday 4 June. "Friends, family, banners, food and instruments" all welcome.
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    I hate shit like this. Do any of those repulsive feminists actually think one rapist is going to think twice next time? They are perverse, vile people who would likely commit their crime even if there was a deterrent like the death penalty. When they've got a knife pressed up to a womans throat and they're tearing her knickers off, they are not going to suddenly think "Hang on, I remember some fat dykes walking around London a few weeks ago, I'd better stop". It's just an excuse for bored do-gooders to hold up signs like "I'm a slut" and think it's amusing to wear few clothes. They probably care about the women who have been raped but surely they could do something more productive than prance around making a show of yourself? How about doing some charity work and giving the funds to a legitimate organization which helps women? Or would that not get enough headlines?

    Yeah, I thought not.

    By holding up such trivial signs and wearing clothes like they have, it makes a mockery of any woman who has been raped. If I knew someone who had gone through such a thing and I saw these bunch of attention seeking c*nts, I'd be furious at them.
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    I can see what they mean though, a lot of stupid people think that dressing provocatively is "asking for it". Instead of blaming the offender, they blame the victim.... which is what this is supposed to draw attention to. It's something which this country is particularly bad at, and not just in rape cases.

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    I can see what they mean though, a lot of stupid people think that dressing provocatively is "asking for it".
    Agreed.

    What I find quite funny though is that, when miniskirts and high heels and so on were first becoming popular, it was seen as a feminist 'awakening'. "Women are becoming proud of their femininity and their freedom to express it!"

    Fast forward a few years and: "Miniskirts are degrading to women! It objectifies them!"

    Urh....I'm not a feminist (at least not the modern interpretation of one), so I don't understand what goes on inside their fickle little heads, but they really need to make up their god damn minds.

    But anyway...while I think there is a definite trend of almost blaming the victim in some parts of the world, and I do think that we have the right to wear whatever the hell we damn well please, I'm not sure that the tone of this march isn't going to draw more sniggers than it will provoke serious discussion of the issue.

    There's no doubt that the "oh, she was asking for it" attitude is one that needs to change, and rapists should get far harsher punishments than they do (I can't think of many crimes that make my skin crawl more than rape), but I think there are probably better ways to do it.

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    Jack, youre missing the point. slutwalk was started after a police officer stated that women could avoid being raped if they didnt dress "like sluts." The protest is against the idea that the victim was in some way "asking for it" by the way they dress. Way to go off on a rant about shit you know nothing about and make yourself look like a douchebag, though.

    Etz gets it. Its about changing public perception not getting through to rapists themselves.

    And seraphina, there are many different types or "waves" of feminists with different views on how to represent it. I'm a feminist and I'm a man... And thats not contradictory nor a conflict of interests. to lump us all together and refer to our minds as "fickle little heads" is insulting and asshole-ish to say the least.

    I was planning on taking part in the slutwalk in chicago myself this year.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack View Post
    I hate shit like this. Do any of those repulsive feminists actually think one rapist is going to think twice next time? They are perverse, vile people who would likely commit their crime even if there was a deterrent like the death penalty. When they've got a knife pressed up to a womans throat and they're tearing her knickers off, they are not going to suddenly think "Hang on, I remember some fat dykes walking around London a few weeks ago, I'd better stop". It's just an excuse for bored do-gooders to hold up signs like "I'm a slut" and think it's amusing to wear few clothes. They probably care about the women who have been raped but surely they could do something more productive than prance around making a show of yourself? How about doing some charity work and giving the funds to a legitimate organization which helps women? Or would that not get enough headlines?
    "Hey, don't rape people please" isn't the message. The point their making is that rape isn't the woman's fault. There's this relatively wide spread attitude that dressing provocatively, or being a flirt, or letting men buy you drinks makes rape okay. As Twiggie said, it's in relations to a police officer who's been in the news for saying that if a woman who's dressed like "a slut" gets raped, then that's her fault, not the mans, because she should have dressed more conservatively.

    That's what they mean by the tongue-in-cheek thing about reclaiming the word "slut", like, being a slut in someone's eyes doesn't make it okay for them to rape you. That's what this thing's about, it's not about prevention of the problem, it's about awareness of it, that this is genuine problem that exists in the world and people need to be aware it exists, and that it's not an acceptable attitude to have.

    Are there better ways to make that point? Yeah, probably, but you can't disagree with the message.
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Hancock View Post
    "Hey, don't rape people please" isn't the message. The point their making is that rape isn't the woman's fault. There's this relatively wide spread attitude that dressing provocatively, or being a flirt, or letting men buy you drinks makes rape okay. As Twiggie said, it's in relations to a police officer who's been in the news for saying that if a woman who's dressed like "a slut" gets raped, then that's her fault, not the mans, because she should have dressed more conservatively.

    That's what they mean by the tongue-in-cheek thing about reclaiming the word "slut", like, being a slut in someone's eyes doesn't make it okay for them to rape you. That's what this thing's about, it's not about prevention of the problem, it's about awareness of it, that this is genuine problem that exists in the world and people need to be aware it exists, and that it's not an acceptable attitude to have.

    Are there better ways to make that point? Yeah, probably, but you can't disagree with the message.
    I can but only because I feel their message is so mixed that it doesn't directly address what you are saying it does.

    It's fine to say that you want to protest against the stigma that in some way rape can be a woman's fault but the whole premise of these walks about one officer advising women not to dress in a way that could make them more of a target ("women should avoid dressing like sluts in order to not be victimized"). Yes his wording is all kinds of wrong but has he really done anything more than say "if you wander around with your wallet hanging out your pocket then you're more of a target for pickpockets".

    Yes I do totally understand that attitudes to rape can be anything from archaic to down right offensive but what you say as "Tongue in cheek
    " reclamation of words etc is not played as that by those taking part. Funnily enough I've had a small conversation with someone who is taking part in these walks in the US and very definitely she was of the opinion the march is about being "sex positive" and reclaiming the word slut and that somehow the police have suggest it is OK to rape women who dress "sluttily".

    So yeah, your message I can't argue with. Their message I can.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Omega View Post
    I can but only because I feel their message is so mixed that it doesn't directly address what you are saying it does.

    It's fine to say that you want to protest against the stigma that in some way rape can be a woman's fault but the whole premise of these walks about one officer advising women not to dress in a way that could make them more of a target ("women should avoid dressing like sluts in order to not be victimized"). Yes his wording is all kinds of wrong but has he really done anything more than say "if you wander around with your wallet hanging out your pocket then you're more of a target for pickpockets".

    Yes I do totally understand that attitudes to rape can be anything from archaic to down right offensive but what you say as "Tongue in cheek
    " reclamation of words etc is not played as that by those taking part. Funnily enough I've had a small conversation with someone who is taking part in these walks in the US and very definitely she was of the opinion the march is about being "sex positive" and reclaiming the word slut and that somehow the police have suggest it is OK to rape women who dress "sluttily".

    So yeah, your message I can't argue with. Their message I can.
    It was a female officer who made the comment.
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  9. #9
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    According to this article it was a male officer. http://www.excal.on.ca/news/dont-dre...t-toronto-cop/

    I think t's a good idea to confront people and make them think about the way that so much sexist language is used but I think this is a bit too OTT to be taken seriously.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anime Otaku View Post
    According to this article it was a male officer. http://www.excal.on.ca/news/dont-dre...t-toronto-cop/

    I think t's a good idea to confront people and make them think about the way that so much sexist language is used but I think this is a bit too OTT to be taken seriously.
    So was burning bras, at the time.

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